Recent posts

  • Type: News
    Post date: Apr 24th 2019
    Body:

    USCIS updated the following USCIS form:

    04/22/2019 12:00 AM EDT 
     
    For more information, please visit our Forms Updates page.
  • Type: News
    Post date: Apr 23rd 2019
    Body:

    Starting June 1, USCIS is ending the Forms Request Line service that allows you to order forms by phone. This is part of our continuing effort to modernize the processes and promote  online products and services.

    You can still request mailed forms by calling the USCIS Contact Center or through  Forms by Mail online request tool.  However,  the center encourages you to download and print forms for free from the website at www.uscis.gov/forms.

  • Type: News
    Post date: Apr 23rd 2019
    Body:

    Certain Israeli nationals who are lawfully present in the United States will soon be able to request a change of status to the E-2 treaty investor classification. Beginning May 1, eligible Israeli nationals already in the United States in a lawful nonimmigrant status can file Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, to request a change of status to E-2 classification, or a qualifying employer can file the petition on their behalf. Spouses and unmarried children under 21 years of age of treaty investors and employees who are already in the United States may also seek to change status to E-2 classification as dependents by filing Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status.

    The E-2 nonimmigrant classification allows citizens of countries with which the United States has a treaty of commerce and navigation to be admitted to the United States when they are investing substantial capital in a U.S. business. E-2 status is also available to certain employees of such investors or qualifying organizations.

    For more on the E-2 classification, see  E-2 Treaty Investors page.

  • Type: News
    Post date: Apr 23rd 2019
    Body:

    USCIS is issuing policy guidance in the USCIS Policy Manual to clarify that violations of federal controlled substance law, including violations involving marijuana, are generally a bar to establishing good moral character for naturalization, even where that conduct would not be an offense under state law.  The policy guidance also clarifies that an applicant who is involved in certain marijuana-related activities may lack good moral character if found to have violated federal law, even if such activity has been decriminalized under applicable state laws.

    Since 1996, some states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws to decriminalize the manufacture, possession, distribution, and use of both medical and non-medical (recreational) marijuana in their respective jurisdictions. However, federal law classifies marijuana as a “Schedule I” controlled substance whose manufacture (which includes production, such as planting, cultivation, growing, or harvesting), distribution, dispensing, or possession may lead to immigration consequences.

    Please see the Policy Manual Update (PDF, 211 KB) for more information.

  • Type: Audio and Video
    Post date: Apr 21st 2019
    Body: